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THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

The Pledge

(click to enlarge)

As the new school year approaches, many classrooms will start the day or week with students and teachers reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. Teachers will discuss the vocabulary of the Pledge; What is a pledge? What does allegiance mean? What type of government is a Republic? What are the definitions of liberty and justice? Are those rights guaranteed for all citizens? If so, how?, but when will students learn the history of the Pledge?

In 1892 Francis Bellamy, native of Rome, N.Y., a former minister and socialist, took a job with a magazine, The Youth’s Companion. In order to increase subscriptions, the magazine started selling U.S. flags to schools and assigned Bellamy to write a pledge to the flag that would be repeated on Columbus Day of that year. Bellamy’s original Pledge stated, “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands – one nation indivisible- with liberty and justice for all.” The word “to” was inserted before “the Republic” then the entire Pledge was published in the September issue of the magazine. Thousands of leaflets were also sent out to schools encouraging teachers and students to recite the Pledge of Allegiance on Oct. 12, 1892. In addition to the Pledge, participants were instructed to make the Bellamy salute, At the words, “to my Flag,” the right hand is extended gracefully, palm upward, toward the Flag, and remains in this gesture till the end of the affirmation; whereupon all hands immediately drop to the side.

How has the wording of the Pledge changed, and why? In 1923, My Flag was changed into The Flag of the United States. In 1942 Congress made the Pledge of Allegiance official and also stated that the “hand over heart was the appropriate stance, not the salute”, which was too Hitler- like. In 1954, during the fears of the Cold War, President Eisenhower’s administration added the words, “Under God”.

Pledge of Allegiance

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In teaching the Pledge, teachers might also include a discussion about the meaning of the colors and stars in the flag, as well as where students see the flag flying in the community. What is proper flag etiquette? Why is the Star Spangled banner sung at sporting events, but the audience does not recite the Pledge? The Post Office issued its first full color flag stamp on July 4, 1957. If students look closely, discuss why the flag has only 48 stars.

 

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BOOKLETS CAN BE PURCHASED AND DOWNLOADED DIRECTLY TO YOUR COMPUTER. EACH LESSON CONTAINS TEACHING STRATEGIES TO ENGAGE STUDENTS, ALONG WITH ALL THE IMAGES FROM THE FIRST DAY COVERS AND OTHER PRIMARY SOURCES AS CALLED FOR.

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ENVELOPES MAY BE SMALL BUT CARRY HUGE MESSAGES!

 

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FDC Lessons-­‐-­‐TEACH HISTORY USING FIRST DAY COVERS

eBooks! United States History and Texas History

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The Battles of Lexington & Concord

James Madison

Sojourner Truth

Civil War Centennial First Day Issue

United States History 1607-1877

Set One – Colonies through Revolutionary War 1607-1783 – 13 Lessons

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Set Two – New Government – New Nation 1783-1820 – 11 Lessons

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Set Three – Pre Civil War 1820-1860 – 11 Lessons

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Set Four – Civil War – Reconstruction 1860-1877 – 12 Lessons

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Statue of Liberty First Day Issue

James Montgomery Flagg

FDR First Day Issue

Tear Down This Wall First Day Issue

United States History 1877-2001

Set Five – Gilded Age through Progressive Era 1877-1912 – 19 Lessons

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Set Six – World War I through Roaring Twenties 1912-1933 - 10 Lessons

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Set Seven – Great Depression through World War II 1933-1945 – 11 Lessons

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Set Eight – Cold War and Civil Rights 1945-2001 – 19 Lessons

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Texas History

Set Nine – Coronado through President G.W. Bush – 19 Lessons

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Texas Reader – Including and Such As Texans – 20 Biographies of Texans

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Each FDC Lessons eBook provides the teacher with warm up or review lessons including first day cover images as well as other primary sources as called for in the lesson. Each lesson is based on the students analyzing the images found on a first day cover (an envelope containing a commemorative stamp, appropriate postmark and artwork). The lessons provide the teacher with strategies to hook students on the topic of study, such as questions targeting the 5W/H as well as analyzing, generalizing, drawing inferences or conclusions, and cause and effect. Images can be projected onto a white board for whole class discussion or printed out for individual student work. Other primary sources (diary entries, letters, resolutions and excerpts from speeches) where appropriate may be included in the lesson, and each lesson has a concluding activity. The lessons can be a quick introduction to a fuller lesson all ready created by the teacher, or it can be a way to provide students with the images and facts needed to remember the history necessary to pass the state standardized tests. Lessons provide procedures, discussion questions, teacher notes, activities, Web sites, and one to four color reproductions of the first day covers. The eBooks are in pdf format. When purchased, each will be downloaded directly to your computer.

eBOOKS! CAN BE FOUND AT WWW.FDCLESSONS.COM