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Perceived Injustice & Citizen Response

Ask students to define the words “republic” and “democracy’. How does a democracy or republic sustain itself? What role do citizens play in the functioning of the government, whether it be local, state, or national? If citizens disagree with laws passed by their representatives what can they do?

Repeal The Stamp Act

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Henry David Thoreau

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March on Selma

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Review the different type of taxes collected in the 1764 Sugar Act and the 1765 Stamp Act (indirect and direct) and the perceived injustices as seen by the colonists. What “civil disobedience” actions did the colonists engage in to register their displeasure with the taxes? How did Parliament respond?

Henry David Thoreau, an author from Massachusetts, was also an abolitionist. In 1846 he put his beliefs into action which led to a night in jail, by refusing to pay taxes he believed were supporting a war that would spread slavery. In 1850 Thoreau wrote an essay calling for the “committed resistance to laws that violated one’s conscience and moral convictions”. What law was passed in 1850 that he was protesting? As an abolitionist, what other actions could he take to protest slavery?

In the 1960’s people protested the laws that discriminated against African-Americans, including those that prevented people from casting a ballot, the basis of a democracy. In 1965 the “Selma Marchers” were met by violence from state police and angry citizens but ultimately rejoiced when the Voting Rights Act was signed into law. What did it guarantee? How is the right to vote protected today?

These are just three examples in U.S. history of citizen’s reactions to “perceived injustices”. As students discuss current events, teachers can challenge them to find other examples of “perceived injustices” and identify the methods used by citizens to work for change. In conclusions, students should also identify the results of those protests.

 

 

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BOOKLETS CAN BE PURCHASED AND DOWNLOADED DIRECTLY TO YOUR COMPUTER. EACH LESSON CONTAINS TEACHING STRATEGIES TO ENGAGE STUDENTS, ALONG WITH ALL THE IMAGES FROM THE FIRST DAY COVERS AND OTHER PRIMARY SOURCES AS CALLED FOR.

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FDC Lessons-­‐-­‐TEACH HISTORY USING FIRST DAY COVERS

eBooks! United States History and Texas History

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The Battles of Lexington & Concord

James Madison

Sojourner Truth

Civil War Centennial First Day Issue

United States History 1607-1877

Set One – Colonies through Revolutionary War 1607-1783 – 13 Lessons

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Set Two – New Government – New Nation 1783-1820 – 11 Lessons

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Set Three – Pre Civil War 1820-1860 – 11 Lessons

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Set Four – Civil War – Reconstruction 1860-1877 – 12 Lessons

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Statue of Liberty First Day Issue

James Montgomery Flagg

FDR First Day Issue

Tear Down This Wall First Day Issue

United States History 1877-2001

Set Five – Gilded Age through Progressive Era 1877-1912 – 19 Lessons

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Set Six – World War I through Roaring Twenties 1912-1933 - 10 Lessons

$13.95

Set Seven – Great Depression through World War II 1933-1945 – 11 Lessons

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Set Eight – Cold War and Civil Rights 1945-2001 – 19 Lessons

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Texas History

Set Nine – Coronado through President G.W. Bush – 19 Lessons

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Texas Reader – Including and Such As Texans – 20 Biographies of Texans

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Each FDC Lessons eBook provides the teacher with warm up or review lessons including first day cover images as well as other primary sources as called for in the lesson. Each lesson is based on the students analyzing the images found on a first day cover (an envelope containing a commemorative stamp, appropriate postmark and artwork). The lessons provide the teacher with strategies to hook students on the topic of study, such as questions targeting the 5W/H as well as analyzing, generalizing, drawing inferences or conclusions, and cause and effect. Images can be projected onto a white board for whole class discussion or printed out for individual student work. Other primary sources (diary entries, letters, resolutions and excerpts from speeches) where appropriate may be included in the lesson, and each lesson has a concluding activity. The lessons can be a quick introduction to a fuller lesson all ready created by the teacher, or it can be a way to provide students with the images and facts needed to remember the history necessary to pass the state standardized tests. Lessons provide procedures, discussion questions, teacher notes, activities, Web sites, and one to four color reproductions of the first day covers. The eBooks are in pdf format. When purchased, each will be downloaded directly to your computer.

eBOOKS! CAN BE FOUND AT WWW.FDCLESSONS.COM